Academic Essays

  • All
  • Fascism and Its Memory
  • Fascist Cinema and Propaganda
  • Film and Transition to Democracy
  • Italian Colonialism

Unmaking the Fascist Man: Film, Masculinity, and the Transition from Dictatorship

Journal of Modern Italian Studies, vol. 10, no.3 (fall 2005): 336-365.

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Un cinéma d’après-guerre : le néoréalisme italien et la transition démocratique

Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, vol.63, no.6 (novembre-décembre 2008): 1215-1248

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Fascism, Writing, and Memory: The Realist Aesthetic in Italy, 1930-50

The Journal of Modern History 67 (September 1995), pp.627-665

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Italian Fascism’s Empire Cinema: Kif tebbi, The Conquest of Libya, and the Assault on the Nomadic

in Postcolonial Cinemas: History, Aesthetics, Epistemes, ed. Sandra Ponzanesi and Marguerite Waller (New York: Routledge, 2011), pp.20-31

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Moving Images: Realism and Propaganda

in Italia 1918-1943. Lo Stato dell’Arte, ed.Germano Celant (Milan: Fondazione Prada, 2018), pp.420-425

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Modernity is Just Over There: Colonialism and the Dilemmas of Italian National Identity

Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, vol.8, no.3 (2006): 380-393

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A Lesser Evil? Italian Fascism in/and the Totalitarian Equation

in The Lesser Evil: Moral Approaches to Genocide Practices, eds. Helmut Dubiel and Gabriel Motzkin (New York and London: Routledge, 2004), pp.137-153.

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Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany: The Dynamics of an Uneasy Relationship

in “Art, Culture, and the Media in the Third Reich” ed. Richard Etlin (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002), pp.257-286.

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Ruth Ben-Ghiat Portrait

Ruth Ben-Ghiat has been recognized for her groundbreaking interdisciplinary work throughout her career. Her scholarship on fascism, World War Two, and visual propaganda has introduced new approaches, broken with prevailing orthodoxies, and integrated new sources, from forgotten Fascist-era films and novels to documents from the United Nations War Crimes Commission.

Ruth Ben-Ghiat Portrait

Ruth Ben-Ghiat has been recognized for her groundbreaking interdisciplinary work throughout her career. Her scholarship on fascism, World War Two, and visual propaganda has introduced new approaches, broken with prevailing orthodoxies, and integrated new sources, from forgotten Fascist-era films and novels to documents from the United Nations War Crimes Commission.

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