Italian Mobilities

"This is a great read for anyone who studies Italian emigration, colonialism or immigration, as it allows the reader to see quite clearly how these three topics are deeply interconnected." - Avy Valladares, Berkeley City College, Altreitalie

Italian Mobilities, edited with Stephanie Malia Hom. Routledge, 2015.

Italy: site of the largest voluntary emigration from any country in recorded world history; favored destination of leisure travellers from the Grand Tour onward; and a bridge between Europe and Africa, where migrants come after perilous sea journeys. Yet Italy is equally a place of fixity, of deep attachments to place and patrimony. Our volume looks at all of these histories and the tensions between mobility and rootedness, bringing migration studies, mobility studies, and Italian studies together. Essays by Pamela Ballinger, Nicholas Harney, Rhiannon Noel Welch, Stephanie Malia Hom, Guido Tintori, Francesca Locatelli, Aine O’Healy, David Forgacs.

Review:

The methodological value of this volume consists precisely in finding connections between past and present while using the larger umbrella of mobilities studies as a comparative lens through which to study a variety of historical phenomena. The volume explores at great length the formation of Italianness through mobility.

―Cristina Lombardi-Diop, Loyola University Chicago, Italian American Review, Volume 8, Number 1
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